HDMI an UHD

HDMI AND ULTRA HD

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a licensable audio/video connector interface for transmitting uncompressed, encrypted (HDCP) digital streams via a single cable. HDMI dramatically simplifies cabling and helps provide consumers with the highest-quality home theatre & gaming experience.

HDMI provides an interface between any audio/video source (Set-top box, DVD player, PC, Game console), as well as connecting an A/V receiver, to video displays (Digital flat screen display or projector) over a single cable. HDMI is continually evolving to meet the needs of the market.

 

HDMI 2.0
HDMI 2.0 significantly increases bandwidth up to 18Gbps and adds key features to deliver enhanced consumer video and audio experience. HDMI 2.0 is backwards compatible with its earlier versions.

HDMI 2.0 includes the following advanced features:

  • Resolutions up to 4K@50/60 (2160p), which is 4 times the clarity of 1080p/60 video resolution.
  • Up to 32 audio channels for a multi-dimensional immersive audio experience.
  • Up to 1536kHz audio sample frequency for the highest audio fidelity.
  • Simultaneous delivery of dual video streams to multiple users on the same screen.
  • Simultaneous delivery of multi-stream audio to multiple users (Up to 4).
  • Support for the wide angle theatrical 21:9 video aspect ratio.
  • Dynamic synchronization of video and audio streams.
  • CEC extensions provide more expanded command and control of consumer electronics devices through a single control point.

 

Cable Requirements for HDMI 2.0
Although HDMI 2.0 does not define new cable or connectors, however, it does require a genuine High Speed (Category 2) cable i.e. cable bandwidth of at least 10.2Gbps. The fact is that many HDMI cables (especially 3m or longer) labelled as High Speed fail to meet this requirement. This is epidemic in unbranded products.

Potential Problems
Cables with insufficient bandwidth will lead to unpredictable system performance and system failures, which can include intermittent picture dropouts or worse.

Definitive Choice for UltraHD
All Wireworld HDMI cables (every length and model) exceed the 10.2Gbps speed required for 4K/60fps UltraHD video as specified in HDMI2.0, in fact our shorter lengths can perform up to speed of 30Gbps!

 

Wireworld Series 7 HDMI cables Click Here

 

HDMI v1.4
Major enhancements introduced in the HDMI 1.4 specification are:

HDMI Ethernet Channel – Adds High-speed networking (bi-directional at up to 100Mb/sec) to an HDMI link, allowing users to take full advantage of their IP-enabled devices without a separate Ethernet cable.

  • Accommodates current and future IP-based networking solutions for consumer electronics, including DLNA, IPTV, LiquidHD, and UPnP.
  • Allows multiple connected devices to share an Internet connection.
  • Enables native-format content distribution between connected devices, including recording and playback across a networked system.

 

Audio Return Channel – Allows an HDMI-connected TV with a built-in tuner to send audio data "upstream" to a surround audio system, eliminating the need for a separate audio cable.

  • An Audio Return Channel-enabled TV can either send or receive audio via HDMI, upstream or downstream, depending on system set-up and user preferences.
  • LipSync functionality, introduced in HDMI 1.3, ensures that the audio stays matched to the video, automatically compensating for any processor delays whether the audio is travelling upstream or downstream.

 

3D – Defines input/output protocols for major 3D video formats, paving the way for true 3D gaming and 3D home theatre applications.

 

4K Support – Adds support for extremely high video resolutions (beyond 1080p). The term “4K” actually covers two formats, both supported in the HDMI 1.4 specification:

  • 3840 pixels wide by 2160 pixels high
  • 4096 pixels wide by 2160 pixels high

 

Content Type – Real-time signalling of content types between display and source devices. The “Content Type” feature enables a display to auto-select the correct viewing mode to match the content type it is currently receiving from a source device, and to switch modes when a new content source is selected.

 

Additional Colour Spaces – Adds support for additional colour models (colour gamut) used in digital photography and computer graphics. In addition to RGB colour and x.v.Color, the HDMI standard now offers native support for three additional colour spaces:

  • sYCC601 colour
  • Adobe RGB colour
  • Adobe YCC601 colour

 

HDMI Micro Connector – A new, smaller connector for phones and other portable devices, supporting video resolutions up to 1080p.This new "Type D" connector is roughly the size of a Micro USB connector and has a full nineteen-pin array like other HDMI connectors.

 

Automotive Connection System – New cables and connectors for automotive video systems, designed to meet the unique demands of the motoring environment while delivering true HD quality.

The new automotive connection system consists of two elements: A new type of Automotive HDMI cable and a new category of locking HDMI connector, known as the “Type E” connector, designed for securing internal connections within a vehicle.

 

New HDMI labelling
With the release of the HDMI V1.4 specification, the HDMI Licensing LLC has also introduced a new system of cable labelling. There are now five HDMI cable types, each designed to meet a particular performance standard. Here is an overview of the HDMI cable types, their capabilities, and how to tell them apart.

All HDMI cable products will now be required to be labelled by cable type:

Standard Speed HDMI 
Standard HDMI cable: HDMI cable that is designed and tested to reliably transmit 1080i or 720p video.

 

Standard Speed with Ethernet HDMI
Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet: This cable type offers the same baseline performance as the Standard HDMI Cable shown above (720p or 1080i video resolution), plus an additional, dedicated data channel, known as the HDMI Ethernet Channel.


Automotive HDMI
Automotive HDMI Cable: Designed for internal cabling of vehicles equipped with onboard HD video systems. Tested to a more robust performance standard, and capable of withstanding the unique stresses of the motoring environment.

 

High Speed HDMI
High Speed HDMI Cable: The High Speed HDMI cable is designed and tested to handle video resolutions of 1080p and beyond, including 4K, 3D, and Deep Colour.

 

High Speed Ethernet HDMI
High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet: This cable type offers the same baseline performance as the High Speed HDMI Cable shown above, plus an additional dedicated data channel, known as the HDMI Ethernet Channel.

Further information is available in the FAQ sections 1, 2 & 3.

FAQ Section 1: HDMI™ General Questions
FAQ Section 2: HDMI™ Compatibility and Interoperability Questions
 

HDMI revision

1.0

1.1

1.2/1.2a

1.3/1.3a/1.3b

Maximum signal bandwidth (MHz)

165

165

165

340

Maximum TMDS bandwidth (Gbit/s)

4.95

4.95

4.95

10.2

Maximum video bandwidth (Gbit/s)

3.96

3.96

3.96

8.16

Maximum audio bandwidth (Mbit/s)

36.86

36.86

36.86

36.86

Resolutions possible over single link HDMI at 24bits/pixel

1920x1080 p60

1920x1080 p60

1920x1080 p60

2560x1600 p60

RGB

yes

yes

yes

yes

YCbCr

yes

yes

yes

yes

xvYCC

no

no

no

yes

Deep Color

no

no

no

yes

Maximum Color Depth (bits per pixel)

24

24

24

48*

Consumer Electronic Control (CEC)**

yes

yes

yes

yes

Updated list of CEC commands***

no

no

no

No (1.3a:yes)

Auto lip-sync

no

no

no

yes

8channel/192 kHz/24-bit audio capability

yes

yes

yes

yes

DVD-A support

no

yes

yes

yes

SACD (DSD) support ****

no

no

yes

yes

Dolby TrueHD bitstream capable

no

no

no

yes

DTS-HD Master Audio bitstream capable

no

no

no

yes

Blu-ray/HD DVD video and audio at full resolution*****

yes

yes

yes

yes


* = 36-bit support is mandatory for Deep Colour compatible CE devices with 48-bit support being optional.
** = CEC has been in the HDMI specification since version 1.0 but has only begun to be used in CE products with HDMI version 1.3.
*** = Large number of additions and clarifications for CEC commands. One addition is CEC command allowing for volume control of an AV receiver.
**** = Playback of SACD may be possible for older revisions if the signal source (such as the Oppo 970) converts to LPCM. For those receivers that have only PCM DAC converters and not DSD, this means that no additional resolution loss occurs.
***** = Even for audio bitstream formats that a given HDMI revision can not transport, it may still be possible to decode the bitstream in the player and transmit the audio as LPCM. For HD DVD, this is always the case, for Blu-ray, this may be the case for newer profile 1.1 players (as these will feature audio decoders anyway), while older profile 1.0 players may or may not support non-mandatory audio codecs even if HDMI 1.3 is used.
NOTE: The Sony PlayStation 3 does not currently support the delivery of Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreams but can decode Dolby TrueHD and deliver it at up to 7.1 channel LPCM.


FAQ Section 1: General HDMI™ Questions

Q1. What are the advantages of HDMI over existing analogue video interfaces such as composite, S-Video and component video?

Quality: Because HDMI is a digital interface, it provides the best quality of the video since there are no lossy analogies to digital conversions as are required for all analogy connections (such as component or S-video). The difference is especially noticeable at higher resolutions such as 1080p. Digital video will be sharper than component, and eliminates the softness and ghosting found with component.  Small, high contrast details such as text bring this difference out the most.

Ease-of-use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio into a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion of multiple cables currently used in A/V systems. This is particularly beneficial when equipment is being upgraded or added.

Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the video source (such as a DVD player) and the DTV, enabling new functionality such as automatic configuration and one-touch play. By using HDMI, devices automatically deliver the most effective format (e.g 480p vs 720p, 16:9 vs 4:3) for the display that it is connected to - eliminating the need for the consumer to scroll through all the format options to guess what looks best.

HD Content-Ready: HDMI devices supporting HDCP have the comfort of knowing they will have access to premium HD content now and in the future. HD-DVD and Blu-ray have delayed the activation of the image constraint token (a.k.a. content protection flag) with today’s HD movies to help minimize potential issues caused by the transition, but are expected to activate this in a few years, meaning future HD movies will then not be viewable at HD resolutions over unprotected interfaces such as analogy component.

Q2.
What is the advantage of using HDMI over existing audio interfaces such as analogy RCA connectors and digital SPDIF (coax and optical connectors)?

Quality: HDMI maintains the audio in its pure digital form all the way to the amplifier.  Analogy audio connections are more prone to losses depending on the cabling and other electronics of the audio rendering device.  Compared to SPDIF connections, HDMI has significantly more bandwidth, allowing it to support the latest lossless audio formats such as Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HS Master Audio.  These formats can not be supported over SPDIF connections due to their very high data rate requirements that exceed the capabilities of SPDIF.  Please also see section on HDMI 1.3 for further details on Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio formats.

Ease of Use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio into a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion of multiple cables currently used in A/V systems. This is particularly beneficial when equipment is being upgraded or added.

Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the audio source (such as a DVD player) and the audio rendering device (such as an A/V receiver), enabling new functionality such as automatic configuration and one-touch play. By using HDMI, devices automatically deliver the most effective format (e.g. Dolby Digital vs. 2 channels PCM) for the A/V receiver that it is connected to - eliminating the need for the consumer to scroll through all the audio format options to guess what is best and properly supported.


FAQ Section 2: HDMI™ Compatibility and Interoperability Questions

Q1. Is HDMI backward compatible with DVI (Digital Visual Interface)?
Q2. What types of video does HDMI support?
Q3. What version of HDMI does a consumer need to view 1080p content?
Q4. Do you need a new version of HDMI to play Blu-ray and HD-DVD content in high definition?
Q5. Are HDMI 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 compatible with the next generation videogame consoles implementing 1080p and HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?
Q6. What is HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?
Q7. Does HDMI support Dolby 5.1 audio and high-resolution audio formats?
Q8. Does HDMI support Dolby Digital, DTS, and high-resolution audio formats?
Q9. Does HDMI support SACD?
Q10. What is the most common compatibility problem among devices with HDMI connections?
Q11. Some cable TV set-top boxes with HDMI outputs don’t deliver a picture to displays with HDMI inputs. What is the problem, and is there a solution?
Q12. If an HDMI accessory device (i.e. switch box, cable booster) does not have a dedicated power supply, is it still compliant and will it work?
Q13. Can any passive devices that use no active electronics (such as a mechanical switch box) be compliant? They are a lot cheaper.

Q1. Is HDMI backward compatible with DVI (Digital Visual Interface)?

Yes, HDMI is fully backward compatible with DVI compliant devices. HDMI DTVs will display video received from existing DVI-equipped products, and DVI-equipped TVs will display video from HDMI sources. However, some older PCs with DVI are designed only to support computer monitors, not televisions. Consumers buying a PC with DVI should make sure that it specifically includes support for television formats and not just computer monitors.

Also, consumers may want to confirm that the DVI interface supports High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP), as content that requires HDCP copy protection will require that both the HDMI and DVI devices support HDCP to properly view the video content.

Q2.
What types of video does HDMI support?

HDMI has the capacity to support existing high-definition video formats (720p, 1080i, and 1080p/60). It also has the flexibility to support enhanced definition formats such as 480p, as well as standard definition formats such as NTSC or PAL.

Q3. What version of HDMI does a consumer need to view 1080p content?

HDMI has always supported 1080p resolution, starting from version 1.0 in 2002. However, as with many functions that HDMI enables (such as DVD-Audio and SACD), it is up to the manufacturer to choose whether to implement 1080p in the device. Some TV and device manufacturers have chosen not to implement 1080p in their products because 1080p content has not been widely available, and because changing the internal electronics of the device to support 1080p would increase cost.

Viewing 1080p resolution requires at minimum that the HDTV have a display supporting the 1080p pixel resolution. Today, many HDTVs use display technologies (such as PDP, LCD, and microdisplay screens) designed for 720p pixel resolution.

In addition, some of today’s 1080p HDTVs support only 720p or 1080i on the HDMI input, then perform video processing to up-convert the 720p/1080i signal to 1080p. This is now changing, as 1080p content is becoming increasingly available, and HDTVs fully supporting 1080p in the display and HDMI electronics became more popular in the market in early 2006.

All versions of HDMI are backward compatible. Consumers should not look for a particular version of HDMI, but rather for the functionality that they want the device to support (SACD, 1080p, etc.).

Q4.
Do you need a new version of HDMI to play Blu-ray and HD-DVD content in high definition?

All versions of the HDMI specification support the ability to watch HD-DVD / Blu-ray content in high definition up to 1080p resolution. However, there may be non-HDMI reasons that prevent some devices from accessing content in high definition, including lack of HDCP support.

Q5. Are HDMI 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 compatible with the next generation videogame consoles implementing 1080p and HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?

HDMI has been able to support 1080p content since version 1.0, and each new revision of the HDMI specification is fully backward compatible with previous revisions.

In June 2006, the HDMI Founders announced HDMI 1.3 and new capabilities to support Deep Colour (up to 16-bit colour RGB colour) and new lossless audio formats (such as Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio). PCs and video game consoles in particular are expected to be capable of delivering content that takes advantage of HDMI's latest capabilities. When such sources are interfaced to older HDMI HDTVs, the source should automatically select the highest quality video and audio performance supported by the HDTV.  

Q6. What is HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?

The new Deep Colour capability lets manufacturers build devices allowing consumers to enjoy billions of colours with incredible visual clarity and detail. HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit RGB colour depths and colour space, an upgrade from the 8-bit maximum resolution in previous versions of the HDMI Specification.

Q7.
Does HDMI support Dolby 5.1 audio and high-resolution audio formats?

Yes. From the start, HDMI was defined to carry 8-channels, of 192kHz, 24-bit uncompressed audio, which exceeds all current consumer media formats. In addition, HDMI can carry any flavour of compressed audio format such as Dolby or DTS. (Such compressed formats are the only multi-channel or high-resolution audio formats that can be carried across the older S/PDIF or AES/EBU interfaces.) Additionally, most existing HDMI sources can output any compressed stream, and the newer sources can output uncompressed 6-channel, 96kHz audio from a DVD-Audio disk. There are A/V receivers on the market that can accept and process the 6- or 8-channel audio from HDMI.

Q8. Does HDMI support Dolby Digital, DTS, and high-resolution audio formats?

Yes. From the start, HDMI was defined to carry 8-channels of 192kHz, 24-bit uncompressed audio, which exceeds all current consumer media formats. In addition, HDMI can carry any currently available flavour of compressed audio format such as Dolby (including Dolby Digital EX 7.1, Dolby Digital plus 7.1, Dolby TrueHD) or DTS (including DTS-ES 6.1 and DTS-HD Master Audio). Such compressed formats are the only multi-channel or high-resolution audio formats that can be carried across the older S/PDIF or AES/EBU interfaces. HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless digital surround audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio. Additionally, most existing HDMI sources can output any compressed stream, and the newer sources can output uncompressed 6-channel, 96kHz audio from a DVD-Audio disk. There are A/V receivers on the market that can accept and process the 6- or 8-channel audio over HDMI.

Q9.
Does HDMI support SACD?

HDMI has supported One Bit Audio format, such as Super Audio CD's DSD (Direct Stream Digital), since version 1.2 (released in August, 2005). Customers interested in this feature should make sure that their device supports SACD.



Wireworld UK, Unit 5, Silicon Business Centre, 26 Wadsworth Road, Perivale, Middlesex, UB6 7JZ
Telephone: 020 8991 9200    Fax: 020 8997 4060   E-mail:info@wireworldcable.co.uk         Site by Think Inc